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Thursday, August 6, 2020 | History

3 edition of Satellite rainfall estimation in the Hindu Kush-Himalayan region found in the catalog.

Satellite rainfall estimation in the Hindu Kush-Himalayan region

Satellite rainfall estimation in the Hindu Kush-Himalayan region

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Published by International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development in Kathmandu .
Written in English


Edition Notes

StatementMandira S. Shrestha, Sagar R. Bajracharya, and Pradeep Mool.
The Physical Object
Pagination10 p. with CD-ROM
Number of Pages10
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL23213813M
LC Control Number2009311105

Earth observations for global water security. the Hindu Kush–Himalayan region, and Central America. Satellite based water information is made freely available from these hubs to users in the regions. H.B. YangAccuracy and spatio-temporal variation of high resolution satellite rainfall estimate over the Ganjiang River Basin. Sci China.   Spy-Satellite Images Reveal How Climate Change Is Rapidly Melting the Himalayan Glaciers and one of the lead authors of February’s Hindu Kush Himalayan Assessment, was .

Validation of satellite rainfall estimation in the summer monsoon dominated area of the Hindu Kush-Himalayan region SR Bajracharya, MS Shrestha, PK Mool, R Thapa Proceedings of the 10th International symposium on hill mountain remote , The average altitude of the Hindu Kush is 4, metres (14, feet). The Hindu Kush system stretches about kilometres ( mi) laterally, and its median north-south measurement is about kilometres ( mi). Only about kilometres ( mi) of the Hindu Kush system is called the Hindu Kush mountains.

Improvement of MODIS snow cover algorithm for the Hindu Kush-Himalayan (HKH) region Bohui Tang 1, 2,, Shrestha Basanta 2, Zhao-Liang Li 1, 3, Gaohuan Liu 1, Hua Ouyang 1, 2, Gurung Deo Raj 2, Amarnath Giriraj 2, and Aung Khun San 2 1 Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, , China. The Hindu Kush Himalayas (HKH) are the freshwater towers of South Asia and parts of Southeast Asia. Water originating from their snow, glaciers and rainfall feed the ten largest river systems in Asia.


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Satellite rainfall estimation in the Hindu Kush-Himalayan region Download PDF EPUB FB2

Climate Change Hindu Kush Himalayan region contains 27% less ice than estimated: study. The region is expected to lose half of its present-day glacier area bysays a study on world’s glaciers. A critically important geo-ecological asset, the Hindu Kush Himalaya (HKH) is the origin of 10 major river basins and encompasses over million km 2 area (Bajracharya and Shrestha ; Bajracharya et al.

) (Fig. ).This HKH area and Tien Shan mountains together form the largest area of permanent ice cover outside of the North and South Poles (hence, the occasional reference to Cited by: 4. The Hindu Kush Himalayan (HKH) region encompassing more than million km 2 area includes areas of Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, India, Myanmar, Nepal, and Pakistan, as well as comprises of many of the Earth's highest mountains and most extensive basins, including the Tianshan Mountains, Himalayas, Pamir, Hengduan Mountains, and Cited by: Satellite rainfall estimates (SRE) from different products have been extensively validated with ground data around the world [7,17, 18] [17], including the Hindu Kush Himalayan (HKH) region [19, 1.

Introduction. The Hindu Kush Himalayan (HKH) region, which is sometimes referred to as the world's Third Pole, has a significant impact on Asian climate and even on global atmospheric circulation due to its great mountain systems and large area of permanent ice cover (Qiu,Yanai and Li,Yao et al., a).In addition, the HKH region is also the source of ten major river systems Cited by: The numerous complexities in discerning precipitation trends within the HKH in recent decades using satellite rainfall estimates, reanalyses, and gridded in situ rain gauge data was illustrated by Palazzi et al.

Their results indicated a statistically significant decreasing trend in Himalaya. An overview of studies of observed climate change in the Hindu Kush Himalayan (HKH) region Article (PDF Available) May with Reads How we measure 'reads'. precipitation in the Hindu Kush Himalayan region over the last plus years, Advances in Climate Change Research (), doi: / This is a PDF file of an unedited.

Improved rainfall estimation over the Indian monsoon region 53 all the synoptic features of the monsoon very well. Though this algorithm performs reasonably well over non-orographic regions, it substantially under-estimates rainfall over orographic regions like the.

In this paper, an attempt has been made to estimate rainfall over the Indian monsoon region by the synergistic use of the geostationary Kalpana-1 satellite-derived INSAT Multispectral Rainfall Algorithm (IMSRA) rainfall estimates and rain gauge data, using a successive correction method in order to further refine the operational IMSRA rainfall estimates.

The poor performance of hydrological models using satellite rainfall estimates has been studied by various researchers. There is general agreement that high‐resolution satellite rainfall estimates need to be corrected before being entered into an operational hydrological model (Thiemig et al., ; Shrestha et al.,; Bitew et al.

The drought characterization is assessed for the three major river basins originating from the Hindu Kush-Himalayan (HKH) region, i.e. the Indus, the Ganga, and the Brahmaputra river basin (IGB. Atmospheric Pollution in the Hindu Kush–Himalaya Region for regional climate.

Data from in situ measurements made at high-altitude stations in the HKH region, observations from satellite. The high-altitude rangelands in the Hindu Kush Himalayan (HKH) region share boundaries with several other ecosystems such as forests, wetlands, and agricultural land.

At present, most of the high-altitude rangelands and their interfaces are suffering from degradation, desertification, and soil erosion, which are further aggravated by climatic. The Indian subcontinent exhibits a wide range of seasonal precipitation regimes across different regions.

To visualize this distribution of total annual precipitation, daily precipitation values for the time period from December to December are segmented into four seasons (DJF, MAM, JJAS, and ON) and spatial fields of seasonal precipitation distribution are generated for all datasets ().

Validation of Satellite Rainfall Estimation in the Summer monsoon; Dominated Area of the Hindu Kush-Himalayan Region.

Grazer Schriften. On Mathe NOAA satellite viewed the snowpack on top of the Hindu Kush Himalayas. During this time of the year, when the snow is melting, people of the Himalayan region replenish their freshwater stores from the mountain range’s runoff to prepare for the dry season.

The Hindu Kush Himalayan region is the location of several of Asia’s great river systems and its snowmelt. The spatial distributions of annual mean precipitation change (%) over the Hindu Kush Himalayan region for (a, c) RCP and (b, d) RCP during (a, b) –65 and (c, d) –95 Limitations and Gaps in the Analysis.

Assessing the Hydrologoical Impacts of Climate Change on the Amu Darya River, Afghanistan. Chapter 3 in Climate Change Modeling for Local Adaptation in the Hindu Kush-Himalayan Region, Community, Environment and Disaster Risk Management, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, ISBN:pp The changes in seasonal snow covered area in the Hindu Kush-Himalayan (HKH) region have been examined using Moderate – resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) 8-day standard snow products.

The average snow covered area of the HKH region based on satellite data from to is million km2 which is % of the total.

Commonly described as the “water tower for Asia,” the Hindu Kush Himalaya (HKH) plays an important role in ensuring water, food, energy, and environmental security for much of the continent.

The HKH is the source of ten major rivers that provide water—while also supporting food and energy production and a range of other ecosystem services. [1] We study the properties of precipitation in the Hindu‐Kush Karakoram Himalaya (HKKH) region using currently available data sets.

We consider satellite rainfall estimates (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission), reanalyses (ERA‐Interim), gridded in situ rain gauge data (Asian Precipitation Highly Resolved Observational Data Integration Towards Evaluation of Water Resources, Climate.

Changing climate and hydrology in the Hindu Kush Himalayan region explains the latest scientific findings on the impact of climate change on water resources and river flow in the Hindu .